SATYAMEVA JAYATE 2 MOVIE REVIEW: Jhon Abrahim and Divya Khoshla

ACTORS:

  • John Abrahim
  • Divya Khoshla Kumar
  • Sahil Vaid
  • Harsh Chaya
  • Gautami Kapoor
  • Anup Soni
  • Zakir Hussain
  • Daya Shankar Panday
  • Rituraj Singh
  • Rajendra Gupta
  • Shaad Randhawa

DIRECTOR:                                                                  

  • Milap milan Zaveri.

PRODUCER:

  • Bhushan kumar
  • Krishan kumar
  • Nikkhil Advani
  • Monisha adhvani

STORY:

Satya Azad, an honourable Interior Minister, wishes to rid the world of corrupt officials to his Anti-Corruption Legislation. However, it does not receive enough ‘Ayes,’ both from his partners, but from his woman Vidya (Divya Khosla Kumar), an Opposition member who votes ‘Nay’ in the Vidhan Sabha. When a couple of heinous killings occur inside the town, ACP Jay Ahmed (John Abraham again) is summoned to apprehend the murderer, regardless of his motive. So, unless you thought the above tale was just about brother vs. brother, think again. There’s more to it.

REVIEW:

The only manner Satyameva Jayate 2 (SMJ2) differs from its predecessor Satyameva Jayate (SMJ) would be by addressing corruption and power greed. At the outset, author Milap Zaveri as well as the film’s crew insisted that it is a mass-market film in the style of 1980s filmmaking. If you see John’s transform into a crime fighter to punish those who are responsible for the deaths of innocent citizens, you’re not quite as amazed as you are once you realise it’s Satya who is handing out all the death penalty and Jay is being enlisted to bring this same vigilante to justice.

Milap makes no attempt to hide the reality that he’s paying tribute to 1980s movie theatre, and his condescension has been clearly visible inside the film script as well as conversations—be it Satya calling the ACP to notify him that he won’t stop penalising the guilty, Jay’s introduction series, or rather, Dadasaheb Azad (John Abraham as one’s grower dad) ploughing a poor cornfield, or the brothers wearing saffron All of this, and more, contribute to the curry powder of the tale.

Apart from the threat of corruption, Milap discusses farmer suicide attempts, women’s abuse (Nirbhaya in Delhi, Veterinarian in Telangana), the Lokpal Bill, the value of communal harmony, and religious tolerance. The writer-director also makes pointed observations about today’s media and social media, which is more concerned with capturing news and spinning it on tablets and smartphones, even if someone is bleeding to death in broad daylight as a result.

In this old-school, all-too-often tried-and-true commercial potboiler fare, John Abraham appears at ease. He excels in all three roles, whether as the twin brothers or as the father. If he is restrained as Satya, he is not afraid to play to the gallery as Jay or Dadasaheb, a simple farmer who leads the fight in the assembly for the Lokpal Bill.

Divya Khosla’s Kumar is charming and plays an important role in this otherwise male-dominated film. Vidya, the righteous one, does not mince her words when she disagrees with and strongly opposes her husband Satya and her Minister father (Harsh Chhaya) on a variety of issues. Gautami Kapoor portrays both Dadasaheb’s wife and Satya and Jay’s mother. Harsh Chhaya, Annup Sonii, Zakir Hussain, Dayashankar Pandey, and Saahil Vaid all perform admirably in their respective roles.

Whether it’s the signature song Tenu Lehanga or the Karwa-Chauth track Meri Zindagi Hai Tu, the soundtrack is easy to listen to, and Nora Fatehi shines in the Kusu Kusu number.

The film’s highlight is the raw die-hard action, and John doesn’t disappoint — even if he has to lift a motorcycle with a motorcyclist and hurl it, rip out such an SUV’s motor, and even rip a few metres of the earth in addition to trying to smash his plough in a field. There are numerous seeti-maar moments for action fans to enjoy.

While we understand that the film is a sort of homage to the 1980s over-the-top cinema where we once enjoyed, some scenes, such as three John Abrahams stopping a helicopter from taking off with their bare hands, maybe too much for even the most OTT sensibilities.

This one is for you if you like massy masala fare from a bygone era and are willing to take on three times as much John Abraham in one frame.

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